Bob Ross Use To Have Straight Hair And Looked Like A G

We're not going to bury the lede here: Bob Ross' hair was actually straight. Just ask his longtime business partner, Annette Kowalski, who knew Ross better than anyone — he had just gotten out of the Air Force, and was unsuccessfully trying to make a living as a painter, she says. "He got this bright idea that he could save money on haircuts. So he let his hair grow, he got a perm, and decided he would never need a haircut again," Kowalski explains. Before he could change it back, though, the perm became his company's logo — Ross hated it. "He could never, ever, ever change his hair, and he was so mad about that," Kowalski says. "He got tired of that curly hair." But viewers never got tired of Ross or his show, The Joy of Painting. With his soft, hypnotic voice, he'd bring his viewers in close as he created 30-minute masterpieces — distant mountain ranges, seascapes, forest scenes, always with those happy little trees. He'd sling his palette around, blend the titanium white paint, whisper about his life in Alaska, then gently tap his fan brush to create a canvas full of fluffy clouds. With his partly unbuttoned chambray shirt, his halo of tight curls and his soothing demeanor, Ross was a fixture on PBS.

NPR- We’re not going to bury the lede here: Bob Ross’ hair was actually straight. Just ask his longtime business partner, Annette Kowalski, who knew Ross better than anyone — he had just gotten out of the Air Force, and was unsuccessfully trying to make a living as a painter, she says.
“He got this bright idea that he could save money on haircuts. So he let his hair grow, he got a perm, and decided he would never need a haircut again,” Kowalski explains.
Before he could change it back, though, the perm became his company’s logo — Ross hated it. “He could never, ever, ever change his hair, and he was so mad about that,” Kowalski says. “He got tired of that curly hair.”
But viewers never got tired of Ross or his show, The Joy of Painting. With his soft, hypnotic voice, he’d bring his viewers in close as he created 30-minute masterpieces — distant mountain ranges, seascapes, forest scenes, always with those happy little trees. He’d sling his palette around, blend the titanium white paint, whisper about his life in Alaska, then gently tap his fan brush to create a canvas full of fluffy clouds. With his partly unbuttoned chambray shirt, his halo of tight curls and his soothing demeanor, Ross was a fixture on PBS.

Shocked. Absolutely shocked. I feel like Kirk Lazarus when he finds out Four Leaf has hands in Tropic Thunder. Like Fuck, Bob. You had great hair! Sure It’s a little bit Vanilla Ice-ish but that head of hair shouldn’t be ruined by some dumb ass notion that you’re saving money and furthermore be ruined and turned into some god damn q-tip puff ball fro we’re now use to. Complete shame. I mean back then in those hippy-ish eras chicks dug painters. Having a painter bro with a sweet head of hair must’ve slayed. And then on top of that you were in the Air Force? Such a baller combo that had to get ruined by quite possibly the dumbest hair style of all time. After the show was a success it should’ve been time for rebranding. Not just “The Joy Of Painting” presented by happy go lucky Bob Ross. Instead try “The Sex Of Painting” Presented by Master Sergeant of the U.S. Air Force, Bob Ross. Instant sex that would stand the test of time. Chicks these days would be cramming paint brushes inside them with suave hair like that.

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